If you FEED it, FIX it!

It’s a natural human instinct to want to feed a stray dog or cat. We totally understand that when you help an animal in need, it makes you feel good. However, this good deed which comes with the best of intentions can lead to a host of other problems including:

  1. Increase in the number of animals at your feeding location because food is readily available.

  2. Feeders who do not clean up after the animals may foul up the area with food remains and litter.

  3. Dogs, over-protective of their territory, may get aggressive and attack people.

  4. Dogs and cats, fed regularly, grow strong and healthy and will produce bigger and healthier litters.

  5. The number of animals grow too large to manage and the town council may be called in to remove the animals after receiving complaints from the public.

  6. Even complete removal of the animals will create a vacuum for other stray dogs and cats to enter the territory and the problem will start all over again.

If you FEED it, FIX it! It is that simple but difficult to do if you are alone. May we suggest that you form a team with other feeders and approach NANAS for help.

NANAS advocates sterilization through community-based Trap Neuter Manage (TNM) programs as the most humane approach to reducing the stray population. It has the following benefits:

If you FEED it, FIX it! It is that simple but difficult to do if you are alone. May we suggest that you form a team with other feeders and approach NANAS for help.

NANAS advocates sterilization through community-based Trap Neuter Manage (TNM) programs as the most humane approach to reducing the stray population. It has the following benefits:

  1. Trapping the animals, females as well as males, to be sterilized is the only way to break the cycle of unwanted pregnancies and the reduction of endless litters of puppies and kittens.

  2. Returning the animals will also ensure that they continue to defend their territory against incoming animals.

  3. A well managed colony will be maintained at a manageable size until all animals live out their natural lives.

  4. Dogs will be less aggressive, less inclined to roam and be easier to manage.

  5. As for cats, there will be less yowling, fighting and urine spray marking by males.
  6. Cats also help to halt the spread of disease by controlling the rodent population in their territories.

For this to work, everyone has to take responsibility. A caregiver needs to be appointed to manage the animals as well as the people feeding them to avoid further complaints from the public.

If you want to start a program in your neighborhood or taman, please email us at nanasspore@gmail.com in Singapore or nanasmalaysia@gmail.com in Malaysia.

Program To Control The Stray Dog Over-Population Problem.

How Does It Work?

  1. An educational program targeted at workers and caregivers (people who look after and feed the dogs) at the outset is recommended to gather support and commitment for the project. This is crucial as they will be instrumental in helping to trap the dogs.

  2. Hotspots will then be selected to kick start the operation.

  3. Dogs are to be rounded up using the Trap Neuter Return Manage (TNRM) method.

  4. All sterilized dogs will have their left ears notched for easy identification and returned to their territories.

  5. Caregivers are encouraged to look after and manage these dogs after they have been returned.

  6. Any problems should be reported to the AWG for further action.

The Benefits Of TNRM

  1. Sterilized dogs will continue to defend their territory against all incoming dogs.

  2. A well managed location will be maintained at a manageable size until all the dogs live out their natural lives.

  3. Dogs will also be less aggressive, less inclined to roam and be easier to manage.

Sterilisation Is The Most Sustainable And Humane Method To Control The Stray Population.

Donate or purchase the new calendar to contribute towards the work of Noah’s Ark Natural Animal Shelter for the animals.

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